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The Festivals

Ancient Egyptian Year

Festivals brought belief to life

The populace’s only opportunity
for group worship outside of their own family or small community

The Festival was not just a local Celebration but often was an occasion for National Celebration throughout Temples across Egypt

Why were Festivals important?

Unlike today’s major religions, Temples were not for use by the population and they could not enter them past the first Courtyard, and even then, they were only allowed inside to give offerings, offer sacrifices and receive aid. But they did not enter the Temple for Worship and they were forbidden from entering the God’s home in the Inner Sanctum. There were no religious services of worship. The Priests served the Gods, not the Populace. The only connection was that the Priests undertook the religious ceremonies that made sure that royalty and the people were seen favourably in the eyes of the Gods.

What did the Festivals mean?

Festivals allowed Worshippers to “see” the Gods and Goddesses that they relied on throughout their daily lives. The average household would often have had statues of deities within their house, but a Festival allowed them to see the real Gods and Goddesses rather than just a copy of them

The Priesthood understood that the ritualised “seeing” of the deities by the public at these festivals reaffirmed the strength of the religious culture; and it served as an opportunity for the population to give their thanks for any boons that they had been allowed throughout the year, and to ask for any sacred favours

Wepet-Renpet: Festival of the New Year

The New Year’s Day Celebration for the rebirth of God Osiris. Click on the Image or the Text for further information.

Festival of the Djed

A pillar resembling a Djed was built and lifted by Pharaoh in honour of the God Osiris. Click on the Image or the Text for further information.

Festival of the Wag: Wagy Festival

This Ferstival followed the Wepet-Renpet Festival but it moved annually as it depended on the flooding of the Nile River. The Festival of the Wag was dedicated to the death of Osiris and the commemorating the dead on their journey in the afterlife. Click on the Image or the Text for further information.

The Opet Festival

The magic of royalty and rejuvenation throughout the Festival stitched a seamless religious connection between the Egyptian people and their royal family, especially their Pharaoh. Click on the Image or the Text for further information.

Heb-Sed Festival: Pharaoh's Jubilee

Celebrating Pharaoh’s revitalisation as a living deity, confirming Pharaoh was still working hand in hand with the Will of the Gods and remained physically fit enough to rule. Click on the Image or the Text for further information.