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Battle & Armistice

Battle of Kadesh - The Military

The Battle

On learning this, Pharaoh sought to gather his other two Divisions, Ptah and Set, with his encamping Divisions, Ra and Amun, on the plains of Kadesh via Messengers but before they arrived Ramses found himself amid battle against a Hittite Chariotry which numbered 2,500 Chariots with 3 men per Chariot. The Re Division was almost totally lost in the affray and Pharaoh survived the surprise attack, according to his propaganda, through his own strength as a God and that given to him by the Egyptian Deities. In reality, we know that if the Ptah Army Division with the Simyra City elite taskforce re-joined, had not arrived just as the Amun Division was starting to flounder then Ramses probably would have been captured or died and many of the Egyptian monuments we know today would have never been built.

Pharaoh Ramses II killing an enemy at the Battle of Kadesh

Relief showing the City of Kadesh during the Battle of Kadesh

Relief showing the Battle of Kadesh

Relief showing Battle of Kadesh

Egyptian killing a Kadesh-ite

The Armistice

After this both Pharaoh Ramses II and King Muwatalli II realised that their own very depleted Army could not continue to fight the other without risking an all-out defeat for themselves, so a tactical win of the Battle was agreed for the Egyptians while a win of the War and retaining of the territory was agreed for the Hittites.

The Egyptians celebrated their “win” with his Poems of Pentaur and Bulletin, in which Ramses is the epitome of the warrior King as can be seen in his Temple at Abu Simbel and in his Reliefs at Karnak Temple in Thebes. The Hittite celebrated their “win” on their Cuneiform Tablets which has only recently been discovered and translated.